Screening News Update: Tougher E-Verify Coming | Soccer Settlement | Roadside Pot Detection

About 3 min

Screening News Update: Tougher E-Verify Coming | Soccer Settlement | Roadside Pot Detection

  • Iowa Murder Speeds Up Efforts to Mandate E-Verify
  • US Soccer Pays Hefty Fine for Failing Kids
  • Canada Ready to Roll out Roadside Marijuana Detection

Iowa Murder Speeds Up Efforts to Mandate E-Verify

The murder of Mollie Tibbetts shook the country, not just because a young life was cut short, but because her killer shouldn’t have even been living or working in the US. Cristhian Rivera has been in the country illegally for about 7 years. For 4 of them, he has been working for Yarrabee Farms. Rivera gave his employer a fake ID and Social Security Number. The farm originally claimed they ran the information through E-Verify, but later issued another statement that they were actually using the Social Security Administration’s database. That database told them that the social security number Rivera gave was valid, but it couldn’t determine that the ID and SSN belonged to someone else. E-Verify, as is stands right now, probably couldn’t do that either, but newly proposed legislation hopes to change that. Senate Bill 3386, The E-Verify System Act of 2018 was proposed on August 23rd by Claire McCaskill (D-MO) and Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND). This bill aims at strengthening the program by making it mandatory for all employers, and by adding the use of pictures and other personal information to help confirm applicants are who they say they are.

US Soccer Pays Hefty Fine for Failing Kids

In one of the largest settlements of its kind, the US Youth Soccer Association and its affiliate, Cal North Soccer Association, will pay a total of $8.2 million to a child who was sexually abused by a coach. The volunteer coach, Emanuele Fabrizio, pleaded guilty to the abuse in 2012 and was sentenced to 15 years in prison. The victim sued the associations because the coach had a domestic violence conviction, which should have disqualified him from working with children. Unfortunately, a background check was never conducted. During court proceedings, the soccer association argued that they did not have a duty to require their local affiliates do background checks. An appellate court disagreed. Background checks are now mandated for all volunteers in the system.  

 
weed out candidates webinar cta
 

Canada Ready to Roll out Roadside Marijuana Detection

One of the toughest hurdles in managing legalized marijuana is figuring out who is impaired and how badly. The Canadian government is taking a big step by rolling out a roadside saliva test. The Drager DrugTest 5000 claims to be able to accurately test for THC and cocaine. Opponents argue that that device gives too many false-negatives and false-positives, and that it can’t be trusted to be accurate in the county’s extremely cold winters. The Canadian Justice Department says they are convinced that it will work. While this test might be valuable when it comes to keeping impaired drivers off the road, testing positive is not a criminal offense and can’t be used in court.

Get the latest insights, inspirations, & smiles from EBI