Screening News Update: Angie's List Sued | NYC Cuts Pot Arrests | More Salary Bans [Video]

About 3 min

Screening News Update: Angie's List Sued | NYC Cuts Pot Arrests | More Salary Bans [Video]

  • Home Improvement Website Sued Over Background Checks
  • Pot Smokers in NY Rejoice at Reduced Enforcement
  • More Salary Bans

 

 

Home Improvement Website Sued Over Background Checks

The San Francisco District Attorney is suing the very popular Angie’s List website for false advertising. In the complaint, the DA says the company has made several statements that are “likely to deceive” customers into thinking that every worker entering their homes has had a thorough background check. Their commercials talk about annual background checks, but when you read the fine print and look at their website, it turns out they only do those checks on the principal, owner or relevant manager of their larger providers; not the lower level employees who are often doing the work. The site also says the company depends on consumers to let them know if they hear of any bad acts or anything that needs their attention. In a statement, the company says it disagrees with the claims made in this case and believes their screening process is in the best interest of their customers.

 
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Pot Smokers in NY Rejoice at Reduced Enforcement

The New York City Police Department has announced it plans to cut the number of arrests for smoking marijuana in public in half.  Recreational pot use is not legal in the state, but the Governor is expected to push for it in the near future. Under the new policy, people seen smoking in public will still be handcuffed and be taken to the station for fingerprinting. If they are not on parole, are not facing a warrant, or don’t have an arrest for a violent crime within the last 3 years, they will be let go with just a ticket. The new policy takes effect on September 1st. About 17,500 people are arrested for possession each year in New York City. The Governor’s office says as many as 10,000 could be eliminated by this new procedure.

More Salary Bans

Three more states have now adopted salary history bans. Massachusetts’s and Vermont’s went into effect on July 1st. Connecticut’s starts on January 1st of 2019. The bans prohibit employers from asking job applicants about what they make in their current job or in previous positions. The goal of these bans is to reduce the pay gap between men and women who are doing comparable work. California, Delaware, Hawaii and Oregon already have bans in place. Similar laws are on the horizon for Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. Some major cities have their own local salary history bans in place as well. Employers need to be sure they are up to date on these laws because they can vary from place to place.

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