Legislative Alert - Thursday, March 23rd, 2017: Neiman Marcus Settles Data Breach Suit for $1.6M

About 2 min

Legislative Alert - Thursday, March 23rd, 2017: Neiman Marcus Settles Data Breach Suit for $1.6M

Screening News

  • Neiman Marcus Settles Data Breach Suit
  • Recreational Marijuana Push
  • More Research on the Medical Front
  • California Bill Bans the Box on Applications

 

Neiman Marcus Settles Data Breach Suit

Neiman Marcus has settled a three-year-old lawsuit that exposed the personal information of 350,000 customers. The retailer said malware had been installed on the store’s computer terminals which allowed hackers to get their hands on shoppers’ credit and debit card data. The breach happened in December of 2013, but it has been a long road to get to a settlement. In 2014 a judge dismissed the suit saying the plaintiffs didn’t have standing to sue because any fraudulent charges had been reimbursed by their credit card companies. An appeals court disagreed and reinstated the case. Each of the estimated 640,000 class members will get up to $100 from the settlement. The total cost to Neiman’s is $1.6 million.

 

Recreational Marijuana Push

According to a report in the LA Times, lawmakers in 17 states are pushing to legalize recreational marijuana on upcoming ballots. You can expect to see more than two dozen measures stretching from Hawaii to Connecticut during the next election cycle. The most common reasoning from lawmakers is that they want to tax pot the same way they already tax alcohol. Estimates coming in from California show that legalized marijuana will bring in about $1 billion in tax revenue in just one year.

 

More Research on the Medical Front

The Florida State House is working on a bill that would fund medical marijuana research at the University of Florida. UF has proposed a study called “Marijuana and Safety Outcomes Surveillance System.” It would study 25,000 patients to see how effective low-THC cannabis is for treating their conditions. It will also study the risks of using marijuana for medical purposes, as well as look at how the drug affects children. If passed, HB 3159 would give the university $2.5 million to conduct the research.

 

California Bill Bans the Box on Applications

New legislation in the California General Assembly would prohibit employers from asking anything about an applicant’s criminal history on the job application. The bill does not stop there. Assembly Bill Number 1008 would also keep employers from asking about criminal convictions until the applicant is given a conditional job offer. Employers will also be required to conduct an individual assessment before being able to deny employment based on a criminal conviction.

 

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