Legislative Alert: Sessions Targets Marijuana | Icelandic Equal Pay | Motel Chain Breaks Trust

2 min

Legislative Alert: Sessions Targets Marijuana | Icelandic Equal Pay | Motel Chain Breaks Trust

Screening News

  • Sessions Poses Huge Threat to Blooming Pot Industry
  • Iceland Employers Must Certify Equal Pay
  • Information Privacy goes out the Window at Motel 6

 

Sessions Poses Huge Threat to Blooming Pot Industry

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has rescinded four Obama-era memos that made some variation of marijuana legalization possible in more than half of the country. The memos effectively turned the Justice Department’s focus away from prosecuting marijuana related crimes, even though it is still illegal under federal law. This hands-off approach led to medical marijuana being approved in more than 25 states, and now recreational use of the drug in 8 states. A memo from Sessions to the US attorneys says they should use their own discretion in weighing whether marijuana charges are appropriate in states that have passed laws to make it legal. In a statement, Sessions said the guidance to look the other way undermines the rule of law and the ability of local, state, tribal and federal law enforcement partners to do their jobs. This directive could pave the way for the federal government to push back against the fast growing industry.

 

Iceland Employers Must Certify Equal Pay

Icelandic employers are now required by law to certify that they pay men and women equally. This is the first nation to legislate such equality. The law went into effect last week and applies to any company or organization that has 25 or more full-time employees. Each company will have to get certified by the government to prove they are following the law. Large employers will have to finish their certification by the end of 2018; smaller companies will have a few years depending on how many people they employ. Those that don’t follow this new law will face fines of $500 per day. This doesn’t mean every paycheck will be the same. Employers will be able to pay more based on experience, performance and other factors, but they must be able to prove the difference is not based on gender.

 

Information Privacy goes out the Window at Motel 6

Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson is suing the national hotel chain for voluntarily turning over customer’s private information to agents with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). According to the lawsuit, over the last two years several hotels in both Washington and Arizona were handing over everything from the guests’ names and room numbers to their birthdays, license plate numbers and more. ICE never presented the chain with warrants for the information. Each guest whose information was turned over illegally qualifies as a separate violation of the Consumer Protection Act, and could cost the chain up to $2,000 per violation.

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