Legislative Alert: Congress Tackles Legal Marijuana & Massive Class Action Payouts [Video]

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  • House Committee Blocks Marijuana Protections
  • Congress Discusses FCRA Bill
  • Hiring is Taking Longer

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Wistia video thumbnail - Screening News Update - September 22, 2017
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House Committee Blocks Marijuana Protections

Over the last four years an amendment has been tacked onto spending bills to prevent the Department of Justice from using its budget to fight marijuana use in states that have legalized the drug. This time around, House republicans killed the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment in committee claiming the issue has been too divisive. Senator Rohrabacher pleaded with fellow republicans, but the issue will not even be brought up for a vote. The Rule Committee also blocked a bill that would have made it easier for banks to work with the marijuana industry, as well as several other marijuana related issues. Many of these same issues are in the Senate appropriations bill that was approved back in July, so we will have to wait and see what makes it into the final version of the bill.

[Related On Demand Webinar] 30 Minute Marijuana Update

 

Congress Discusses FCRA Bill

Congress is also considering a bill that would amend the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The FCRA Liability Harmonization Act (H.R. 2359) would amend the FCRA in a way that would limit damages for companies in class action actions. The proposed amendment would cap potential liability to whichever is less: one-percent of a defendant’s net worth or $500,000. It would also eliminate punitive damages. The goal is to prevent unscrupulous attorneys from using the FCRA to build massive class-action suits. The Act does allow for consumers who have been harmed to be compensated appropriately.

[Related Article] FCRA Compliance: What You Need to Know

 

Hiring is Taking Longer

While unemployment numbers are dropping, it is still taking a very long time for workers to get their foot in the door. According to a survey by Glassdoor, it now takes an average of 23.7 days to go from application to the first day on the job – up from 22.5 days in 2016. That number can be even higher depending on the industry. Some of the worst offenders are the government at 53.8 days, aerospace and defense at 32.6 days and energy and utility companies at 28.8 days. The fastest employers are restaurants and bars at 10.2, private security firms with 11.6, and supermarkets which average 12.3 days. All of these numbers will vary depending on the skill level needed for the job, the part of the country and even the time of year.

 [Related Article] 75 Job Posting Sites For Your Next Hire

 

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Jennifer Gladstone

Posted By: Jennifer Gladstone

Jennifer Gladstone is a news anchor and journalist with more than 20 years of experience in front of the camera. She's worked in several markets, large and small, and has performed nearly every task needed in a newsroom. As EBI’s Screening News Editor, she keeps EBI’s customers and blog subscribers up to date on the latest screening news and legislative alerts affecting companies of all sizes.

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