[Video] Legislative Alert March 11, 2016: California DMV Accused of TMI

Jennifer Gladstone

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Screening News Update

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  • Lawsuit over California Screening Loophole
  • Marijuana Bill Passes Georgia House
  • Oklahoma Governor Uses Executive Order to Ban the Box

 

 

 

 

 

Lawsuit over California Screening Loophole

The California Department of Motor Vehicles is being sued for allegedly allowing employers to get a hold of criminal history records that they are not legally entitled to see. The six plaintiffs -- 5 of whom filed anonymously -- claim the DMV violates privacy protections by maintaining records of arrests that did not result in convictions, dismissed convictions and convictions that were set aside. They say the DMV refuses to purge these records even though the plaintiffs claim there is no legitimate use for them. They claim the DMV is reporting the records to employers and background screening companies—and that is in violation of California’s Constitution and Labor Code. The plaintiffs are hoping to be granted class certification, and claim more than a million Californians are affected.

Marijuana Bill Passes Georgia House

Supporters claim it’s been so watered down you can barely recognize it, but a medical marijuana bill has passed in the Georgia House. This lighter version of the bill eliminated a provision to allow medical cannabis to be cultivated in the state. The bill’s chief sponsor, Representative Allen Peake (R-Macon), says cultivation was the heart of the legislation, but is pleased to at least make some progress towards legalization. The amended bill expands the number of diseases that would qualify patients to use cannabis oil, which includes more than a dozen conditions from autism to IBS. 

Oklahoma Governor Uses Executive Order to Ban the Box

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin signed an executive order that requires all state agencies to remove all questions regarding felony convictions from their job applications. The Governor says the state should remove unnecessary barriers for Oklahomans with felony convictions so they can go on to lead productive and successful lives. She did however state that banning the box would not guarantee employment, but would level the playing field to some degree. One in 12 adults in Oklahoma is a convicted felon and more than 55,000 people are currently in prison or under supervision of the state’s Department of Corrections.

 

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Jennifer Gladstone

Posted By: Jennifer Gladstone

Jennifer Gladstone is a news anchor and journalist with more than 20 years of experience in front of the camera. She's worked in several markets, large and small, and has performed nearly every task needed in a newsroom. As EBI’s Screening News Editor, she keeps EBI’s customers and blog subscribers up to date on the latest screening news and legislative alerts affecting companies of all sizes.

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