Legislative Alert - Friday, June 10th, 2016:  Ohio Senate Passes Limited Marijuana Bill to Avoid Public Ballot

Jennifer Gladstone

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Screening News

  • Ohio-marijuana-bill.jpgReluctant Governor Faces Medical Marijuana Bill
  • More Plaintiffs Emerge in the SEPTA Case
  • Stricter Background Checks for some in New Jersey
  • Privacy Shield Slammed by an Expert

 

Reluctant Governor Faces Medical Marijuana Bill

A medical marijuana bill recently passed the Ohio State Senate by just 3 votes. The bill is now sitting on Governor John Kasich’s desk. While the bill prohibits smoking the drug and growing it at home, it will allow patients to buy things like oils, edibles or patches. Very few state lawmakers were actually excited to make Ohio the 25th state to legalize, and the Governor is definitely not rushing to sign it, but they wanted to avoid a constitutional amendment showing up on the November ballot. Polls show that as many as 90 percent of Ohioans support medical marijuana. Lawmakers decided passing the bill was the safer option because the proposed ballot measures allowed marijuana to be home-grown and smoked. Even those who voted for it say the new law is not perfect.

More Plaintiffs Emerge in the SEPTA Case

The list of plaintiffs is growing in the FCRA lawsuit against the country’s 6th largest public transportation system. The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority- or SEPTA- is accused of failing to comply with the Fair Credit Reporting Act by not having the proper disclosure documents. The amended complaint alleges that SEPTA fails to provide proper FCRA notices as well as claiming the system violates the Pennsylvania Criminal History Record Information Act for allegedly disqualifying applicants with unrelated felony convictions. Last week, two more plaintiffs stepped forward.

Stricter Background Checks for some in New Jersey

New Jersey lawmakers are considering requiring even stricter background checks for school teachers, bus drivers and camp counselors. A bill before the state legislature would add a Child Abuse Record Information (CARI) check to the criminal background checks that are already required. If passed, the checks will be performed on all new hires and then again every 5 years for current employees.

Privacy Shield Slammed by an Expert

It is taking quite a while for the Safe Harbor replacement Privacy Shield to get up and running. Now comments from the European Data Protection Supervisor might slow things down some more. Giovanni Buttarelli issued a formal opinion on the data sharing agreement between the EU and the US. He says it is a step in the right direction, but the plan still needs “robust improvements.” These improvements are directed at the European Commission and focus on the automated processing of personal data, as well as data minimization and retention.

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Jennifer Gladstone

Posted By: Jennifer Gladstone

Jennifer Gladstone is a news anchor and journalist with more than 20 years of experience in front of the camera. She's worked in several markets, large and small, and has performed nearly every task needed in a newsroom. As EBI’s Screening News Editor, she keeps EBI’s customers and blog subscribers up to date on the latest screening news and legislative alerts affecting companies of all sizes.

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